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By clicking here you can go to a specific step and part

Step 1: Introduction

Step 1 Part 1 ▾

Step 1 Part 2 ▾

Step 2: Learning more about the context and topic

Step 2 Part 1 ▾

Step 2 Part 2 ▾

Step 3: Research and creation of the documentary

Step 3 Part 1 ▾

Step 4:  Sharing and reflection

Step 4 Part 1 ▾

Step 4 Part 2 ▾

Step 1 Part 1 - Introduction

Questionnaire

The introduction has the objective of introducing the project and motivating students.

Step 1 Part 2 - Starter clip

Fact sheet: Migration

Migration is the movement of persons away from their place of usual residence, either across an international border or within a State.

Migrant is a person who moves away from his or her place of usual residence, whether within a country or across an international border, temporarily or permanently, and for a variety of reasons.”

(Source: International Organization for Migration (IOM) )

Types of migration

●     Internal vs. external migration: moving within or to a different state, country, or continent  

●     Emigration vs. immigration: leaving from or moving to a region, state, or continent    

●     Return migration: moving back to the region, state, or continent a person left

●     Seasonal migration: moving temporarily to another place (usually in response to working- or climate conditions)

Kinds of migrants

●     Refugees are people who fled their country because of conflict, natural disaster or to seek refuge from political, religious, or other forms of persecution.

●     Internally displaced people (IDPs) are like refugees but seek safety within the borders of their own country. 

●     Economic migration: leaving home for work or an improvement of working conditions.

●     Family reunification: someone moving to a different country to join a family member already living there. 

Step 2 Part 1 - The 'then and now' of Migration

Timeline examples of European migration

You can find the timeline with examples of European migration here The  European migration timeline

Fact sheet: Legislation

June 2001

AIRLINE RULE EUROPEAN COUNCIL DIRECTIVE

Under this European directive, an airline that lets someone on a plane without proper entry documents for the destination EU country has to pay the passenger’s repatriation costs if they’re turned away.

There is an exception for refugees and asylum seekers, but airline companies are not in a capacity to decide whether this claim is legal. They are not willing to take the risk of having to cover the costs for deportation and therefore refuse anyone who does not have the right papers. This leaves refugees and asylum seek no alternative than to travel by sea or land.

(Source: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=LEGISSUM:l33139)

June 2001

STRENGTHENING OF THE PENAL FRAMEWORK TO CONTROL MIGRATION

The European Council decided to strengthening of the penal framework to prevent the facilitation of unauthorised entry, transit and residence, to provide European citizens with a high level of safety within an area of freedom, security and justice by developing common action among the Member States in the fields of police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters.

In this framework measures should be taken to combat the aiding of illegal immigration both in connection with unauthorised crossing of the border in the strict sense and for the purpose of sustaining networks which exploit human beings.

To that end it is essential to approximate existing legal provisions, in particular, on the one hand, the precise definition of the infringement in question and the cases of exemption defining the facilitation of unauthorised entry, transit and residence and, on the other hand, minimum rules for penalties, liability of legal persons and jurisdiction, which is the subject of this framework Decision The European Council decided that it is prohibited to help migrants who illegally come to Europe. 

(Source: http://www.europeanmigrationlaw.eu/en/immigration/372-2002946jha-strengthening-of-the-penal-framework-to-prevent-the-facilitation-of-unauthorised-entry-transit-and-residence.html)

February 2003

DUBLIN REGULATION

This regulation says it should be decided quickly to which member state a asylum seeker should be brought. There it will be decided if asylum is granted. A database of fingerprints of migrants was established.

(Source: https://www.unhcr.org/en-us/4a9d13d59.pdf)

April 2004

OBLIGATION OF CARRIERS TO COMMUNICATE PASSENGER DATA

.. Air carriers must give passenger information to the authorities. These informations are: number and type of travel document used, nationality, name and date of birth of the passenger, border crossing point of entry into the EU, departure and arrival time of the transportation, total number of passengers carried.

(Source: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=LEGISSUM:l14582)

October 2004

ESTABLISHMENT OF FRONTEX

Frontex, officially the European Agency for the Management of Operational Cooperation at the External Borders of the Member States of the European Union, was established by Council of Regulation. It began work on October 2005. Frontex was set up to help European Union member states control the borders between EU-countries and the external EU-borders in the same way.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Border_and_Coast_Guard_Agency)

October 2004

LIBYA-ITALY AGREEMENT

Libyan and Italian governments reached a secret agreement that obliged Libya to accept African immigrants deported from Italian territories. This resulted in the mass repatriation of many people from Lampedusa to Libya between 2004 and 2005, a move criticised by the European Parliament.

Libya was the only North African country that did not have a formal agreement with the EU on tackling illegal immigration, and has become the focal point of refugees, most of whom have travelled from across Africa and the Middle East.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

December 2009

LISBON TREATY

This treaty states that EU Member States are compelled to respect human rights, but also that the European Commission shall check member states’ obligations in terms of human rights and the right of asylum.

(Source: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/factsheets/en/sheet/153/management-of-the-external-borders)

March 2012

EUROPEAN OMBUDSMAN INQUIRY

The European Ombudsman opened an inquiry about how FRONTEX was controlling the borders. A report was published : “Lives lost in the Mediterranean Sea: who is responsible?”. It points to the failure of NATO, Italy, Spain and Malta and other countries in meeting their obligations to respond to migrants’ distress calls at sea in March 2011.

(Source: Parliamentary Assembly. Council of Europe)

May 2014

EUROPEAN BORDER AND COAST GUARD/FRONTEX REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

In this regulation, rules are set for the surveillance of the external sea borders.

This regulation has the objective to ensure the efficient monitoring of the crossing of external borders while contributing to ensuring the protection and saving of lives. In doing so, ships that try to enter EU-waters illegally can be intercepted.

(Source: European migration law)

April 2015

EMERGENCY MEETING ABOUT MIGRANT CRISIS

The European Council held an emergency meeting to discuss the migrant crisis. It agreed to triple funding for rescue operations aimed at migrant boats, and several EU member states promised more ships and other resources. It also agreed to look at ways to capture and destroy smugglers' boats before they can be launched, and to send immigration officers to non-EU countries.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

May 2015

PROPOSAL FOR QUOTA SCHEME

The European Commission proposed that EU member states should take in a certain amount of refugees. Countries which had received large numbers of migrants and asylum applications – such as Italy, Malta and Germany – supported the proposal. Others such as Austria, Hungary, Slovakia and Estonia opposed it.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

September - November 2015

TEMPORARY CONTROLS IN COUNTRIES’ BORDERS

Different countries such as Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Croatia, and also Sweden introduced temporary controls on their borders to cope with the inflow of migrants. Other countries decided on more restrictive measures:

Hungary closed its borders and declared a state of emergency. They approved new laws, making it a crime to cross the border illegally and to damage the barrier they built along their borders. 

Other countries like Austria, Slovenia, Macedonia also began to build barriers along their borders.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

September 2015

RELOCATION OF REFUGEES

The EU interior ministers meeting voted by a majority to relocate 120,000 refugees EU-wide. Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia voted against the plan, but they were overruled. The idea was to distribute 120,000 refugees from Greece and Italy over two years. The scheme will only apply to refugees most in need of international protection; not economic migrants. The European Commission proposed that the scheme be mandatory for EU member states.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

November 2015

VALLETA SUMMIT ON MIGRATION

This summit between European and African leaders was held in Valletta, Malta, to discuss the migrant crisis. The leaders signed an agreement to set up an Emergency Trust Fund to help development in African countries as well as to encourage those countries to take back some migrants who arrive in Europe.

(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_the_European_migrant_crisis&action=edit&section=2)

March 2016

EU-TURKEY STATEMENT & ACTION PLAN

The European Council and Turkey reached an agreement aimed at stopping the flow of irregular migration via Turkey to Europe. All new irregular migrants and asylum seekers arriving from Turkey to the Greek islands and whose applications for asylum have been declared inadmissible should be returned to Turkey.

The EU and Turkey also agreed that for every Syrian being returned to Turkey from the Greek islands, another Syrian would be resettled to the EU; Turkey would take any necessary measures to prevent new sea or land routes for irregular migration opening from Turkey to the EU; The EU would disburse €3 billion under the Facility for Refugees in Turkey and other €3 billion by the end of 2018.

(Source: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/headlines/priorities/refugees/20170629STO78632/migration-in-europe)

February 2017

THE EU-LIBYA DEAL

The European Union announced a deal in Malta to curb the flow of migrants from Libya. The EU would support the establishment of ‘safe’ refugee camps within Libya as well as voluntary repatriation of refugees who were willing to return to their countries of origin. Among other things, the deal would boost training and equipment to Libya’s struggling coast guard and get more involved with neighboring nations including Algeria, Tunisia and Egypt to contain flows of migrants.

The processing of these migrants would be done mainly by UNHCR and IOM officials funded by the EU. It was decided also that those qualified for asylum would be afforded passage to Europe while those who are unqualified would be resettled in Libya or repatriated to their countries of origin.

The main problems that this agreement had is that Libya was embroiled in civil war and at the same time, there was news about the deplorable migrant conditions in Libya, so that the migrants who returned there were likely to end up in detention centers. 

(Source: https://www.e-ir.info/2017/04/11/the-eu-libya-migrant-deal-a-deal-of-convenience/)

December 2018

MARRAKECH GLOBAL MIGRATION PACT

A United Nations conference about Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration adopted a migration pact in front of leaders and representatives from over 160 countries in Morocco. Around a dozen countries including US and some EU countries, driven by anti-immigrant populism, said it threatened their sovereignty and forced them to legalize illegal immigration. A final draft was agreed by all UN member states – except the United States.

It is a framework for international cooperation but it is not legally binding.

(Source: https://undocs.org/A/CONF.231/3)

Step 2 Part 2 - Different perspectives in migration

Character cards

Governments

The Italian government transferred the  control of the Mediterranean Sea to the Libyan coast guard in return for money, boats and training to prevent migrants from reaching European waters.

Most European countries have political parties that are opposed to allowing migrants into their countries.

Captain Pia Klemp

Pia Klemp was the captain for Seawatch and the organization Jugend Rettet, founded by young people to help refugees on the Mediterranean. Trained to be a biologist, she went back to university with the explicit goal of becoming a captain for NGOs that state the EU is neglecting its humanitarian duty by outsourcing the guarding of Mediterranean waters to Libya.

Pia Klemp has been accused of collaboration with human traffickers. She could be sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. Her indictment scares off many NGOs. After 2017, much less ships have been sent to the Mediterranean to rescue people. Pending her process, Klemp is politically active in Germany.

Civilians welcoming refugees

In 2015, the peak year of refugees coming to Europe, a lot of civilians were welcoming them. Many people volunteered to help newcomers find their way in their new hometowns.

Angela Merkel’s claim ‘Wir schaffen das’ (‘We can do this’) was supported by a lot of people in Germany.

Captain Schmidt

Born in 1941, Schmidt came from Stettin to Hamburg as a 3-year-old refugee. Stettin became the Polish city of Szczecin in 1945. Schmidt worked as a captain on merchant ships and as a teacher on a nautical college. He planned to retire in 2004, but started working on the Cap Anamur, because he wanted to do something selfless, to set an example for his sons. Saving the refugees and the difficulties that came with it, led him to become politically aware only in 2004.

Since he has been acquitted of human trafficking, he makes an effort to organise the reception of refugees in his home region of Schleswig Holstein. He also gives guest lectures about refugees and the violation of the law of the seas by the EU, whose agreement with Libya makes it difficult for ships to rescue people at sea.

Those who stay at home (Ghana)

“If there was enough work here, people wouldn’t leave. It is in our DNA to want to go to Europe”. People invest a lot of money to send family members to Europe, in pursuit of the European Dream. The ones who stay behind have high hopes. They expect the successful migrants to support them.

“In our society, it seems as if half of the people has been deported from Europe, and the other half plans to leave”.

Coast guards

European government officials claim that the Libyan coast guard has been trained to rescue people, yet this is not their first priority. They patrol the sea in order to prevent migrants from reaching European waters. When they find a boat, the people on it are shipped back to Libya. The coast guard obstructs NGO ships that try to rescue migrants. They even board these ships carrying guns. Sometimes people die.

NGO's

Several NGO’s have been rescuing migrants on the Mediterranean Sea. Recently this has become a difficult thing to do, because ships carrying migrants are refused to land in Mediterranean harbours. Originally, an organisation like Sea Watch wasn’t primarily founded to rescue people. Their first priority was to be a kind of ‘Black Box’, to show people in Europe what was going on, because it is difficult for journalists to go there.

Abdul Aziz

Abdul Aziz fled from Ghana in 2002 because of a dangerous political situation in his home region of Tamale. He went to Libya, where worked and saved up money to pay for a place on a small boat heading for Italy. When the weather got worse, they were in danger. The Cap Anamur, the ship of captain Schmidt, saved them.

After years in Europe, having a difficult life doing hard menial jobs, Abdul returned to Ghana. There he saw his peers had gotten ahead of him in society. At the same time, he saw many young people still cherishing the European dream. Now, Aziz runs a counseling office. He tries to explain to young Ghanaians that life in Europe is hard and that it is preferable to look for a better life in Ghana.

Civilians opposing the arrival of refugees

Protesters in a German town, sporting banners that read: ‘Stop asylum cheaters. Go home. No welcome. Deport’.

In Europe, many people are not happy about migrants coming to their country.

These citizens are afraid of losing their jobs to migrants who are willing to work for low wages. Some fear that municipalities will favour migrants in the allocation of homes. And others are afraid that strangers will influence their culture and traditions. Protesters often don’t object to the welcoming of refugees who flee from violence and prosecution. They fear that migrants looking for a better life pose as refugees in order to get a residence permit.

Camp Moria

Many migrants come to Europe from Turkey and end up in camps in Greece. Camp Moria on the island of Lesbos was built to accommodate 3.000 migrants, but currently hosts 11.000. Hundreds of people sleep in open air, often without mattresses or blankets. They have to wash themselves next to the garbage heap. The Greek government tries to send migrants back to Turkey. The migrants travelled through there hoping to get to European countries like Germany or Great Britain, but the Turkish government refuses to take them back. The EU made an agreement with Turkey in which they promised to bring into Europe a number of Syrian refugees who fled to Turkey. But European countries are lagging behind.

The refugees are stuck in the Greek camps, desperate and with nowhere to go.

Step 3 Part 1 - Research and creation of the documentary based on examples of local history

Rolecards

Researcher

Your functions are:                                                          

  • To investigate the subject of the film on the basis of the central enquiry question. 

  • To search for stories, main persons, archive material (photographs and films that can be used freely) and historical background articles.

  • To check whether the stories are really true. Collect the names and details of the main characters and make the first contact for an interview.

Responsibilities:

NB: in this project, the research is carried out by the entire group.

  • Those who choose the position of researcher are specifically responsible for checking the sources and data (finding out the truth) and for making agreements with the guests/main persons. 

  • During the recording, the researcher provides content support to the interviewer.

  • The researchers make a list of names and functions for the titles in the editing.

*Watch the research tutorial → with your group for more details and read through the steps for researching below

Steps for researching ▾

CLICK HERE to open ⌄

Steps for researching (role for the whole group)

Brainstorm and look for sources

  • First, brainstorm together on how you would like to approach this question so that you can specifically search for the resources you need. What do you want to investigate? Who would answer this question best and where would you find stories about this question?

  • Use different research methods and read different sources as recommended in the tutorial.

  • Write down the sources you use and the information they provide.

  • Make sure you check your sources. Ask yourself, are they reliable?

Mind map

  • Create a profile of the person you would like to interview.

    • What are you actually looking for? What kind of profile does this person have and from what perspective do you want to highlight the theme? From what perspective do you want to tell your story?

  • Compare your mind map with the sources and people you have found and make a choice.

Content summary and plan of action

  • Write a short summary of the research. Include checks and balances as explained in the tutorial.

  • Write a plan of action as indicated in the tutorial

  • Keep in close contact with the interviewer at this stage. He or she will formulate his or her questions based on your data.

Personal contact (do this together with the interviewer)

  • Get in contact with your main character(s).

  • In order to determine whether your main character is really the right person for your film, personal contact is very important. 

  • Set a date for the interview.

  • Check the specific names and titles of your main characters.

Photos

  • If you search for photos, make sure they are free of copyright restrictions as indicated in the tutorial.

Planning

  • Meet with your group to plan out the time you have to make the movie.

    • How much time do you need to spend on research? 

    • When will you conduct the interviews? 

    • How long do you want to take to edit?

  • Make appointments with your main characters and ask permission to film at certain locations.

TO CLOSE THIS FILE CLICK AT 'SLUIT' ^

Interviewer

Your functions are:                                              

  • To ask the guest or main character the interview questions. 

  • To  prepare the interview/questionnaire on the basis of the researcher's information.

  • In consultation with the group, to choose a form of interview that suits the type of documentary chosen. (see tutorial). 

  • To maintain close contact with the cameraman/woman and the editor.

  • To speak to the guest in advance and tell the camera and editor what the interview is about.

Responsibilities:

  • Making a questionnaire that fits in with the research.

  • Responsible for good contact with the guest.

  • Responsible for good cooperation with the cameraman.

  • After the editing, inform the guests about which parts of the interview are in the film.

*A good interviewer will watch the interviewing tutorial → and read the steps for interviewing below. He/she will also share main findings with the group.

Steps for interviewing

CLICK HERE to open ⌄

Steps for interviewing

Preparing the interview

Personal contact (do this together with the researcher)

  • Get in contact with your main character(s). In order to determine whether your main character is really the right person for your film, personal contact is very important.
  • Set a date for the interview.

Choose your way of interviewing

  • Choose the style of interviewing as pointed out in the tutorial: 

    • Are you going to be in it as our guide through the whole story or are you the invisible interviewer and will the story tell itself?

  • Write down your questions based on the research.

Planning the filming with the cameraman/woman

  • Where does the interview take place? Inform your cameraman/woman of the circumstances.

  • What do you need to see in order to tell your whole story? 

  • Plan the scenes you need to complete your interview with the cameraman/woman.

Interview

 

  • During the interview make sure to ask all the questions you need.

  • Check with your cameraman/woman if both sound and video are appropriate. (annex 4 shows the form you can use)

  • Ask for specific names and titles.

  • Be polite / be specific / be complete / be kind.

  • Get permission from your main character to show this interview on social media.

  • Get permission from parents through a quit claim ▾  if your main character is under 18.

TO CLOSE THIS FILE CLICK AT 'SLUIT' ^

Cameraman/women

Your functions are :                                             

  • To shoot all the footage for the film. Not only the interview, but also all the images needed to make a good film and build a logical story. 

  • To think about the locations for filming and the actions to be filmed.

  • to consult with the interviewer beforehand so that she/he can determine what and where to film on the basis of the content of the questions. 

  • To keep in close contact with the editor to ensure that there are enough images for editing with enough variation. 

  • To make sure that there is enough light to play with, check that all scenes are properly captured in image and sound.

  • If necessary, to ask a question again or redo a recording. 

Responsibilities:

  • Filming of all images for the film, both interview and environmental shots.

  • Practise filming according to the tutorial if you need it.

  • Provide the right phone with a charged battery and power bank for recording (possibly via your teacher)

  • Responsible for light when filming indoors.

  • Responsible for good sound.

  • Responsible for good cooperation with the interviewer.

  • Responsible for close cooperation with the editor.

* A good cameraman will watch the filming tutorial → and read the steps for filming. If time allows, also watch the editing tutorial →

Steps for filming

CLICK HERE to open ⌄

Steps for filming

Preparing your materials

  • Make sure you have a charged cell phone with a good camera/extra battery pack/sound.

  • If you are filming in a house or building look for lights if you need them (see tutorial).

Preparing the filming

  • Clarify your understanding: 
    • Who is the main character? 

    • What story are we going to tell and what do we need to see?

    • What actions by the main character will add to the story?

    • Where is the best place to tell this story? (her work, his house, their broken down flat , etc.)

    • Make a list of all the scenes you need.

Filming

  • Film horizontally!

  • Reference the technical aspects on the sheet: specifications for filming on mobile phone (annex 4)

  • Use some MS, wide and close up angles during the interview. (see tutorial)

  • Make extra shots of the interviewer listening for the editing.

  • Make extra shots of the main character listening.

  • Use extra tips from the tutorial in improving your filming.

Download your material

  • Bring your material directly to the editor and download together.

Specifications for filming on a mobile phone

VPRO In Europe Schools

Specifications for filming on a mobile phone

Settings:

Please set your phone to record at 1080p HD resolution by following these instructions:

  • iPhone: Please set your iPhone to said resolution via Settings >Camera>Record Video. Pick 1080p HD at 30fps.

  • Android Samsung, Huawei, HTC, etc): This differs per phone, but these settings can mostly be found via the settings menu inside the camera app or via the general settings menu. In this menu locate the video size menu. Best setting for filming is 1080p HD and 25fps.

  • If this option is not available on your phone, please make sure it is not a number below 1080p and/or 25fps or above 50fps.

Stability:

Try to create a stable environment by using a tripod or a chair to lean on.

Sound:

If possible, use an additional microphone. If you do not have one, avoid filming too far away from your sound object or person.

Extra sound and synchronization:

You could also use an extra phone to record the sound but then you have to synchronize both phones using a clap:

  • Start the audio on one phone and the camera on the other. Now synchronize by clapping your hands slowly. Make sure you record and film the hands and sound.

  • Do not stop your phone after this point. If you stop, you will have to sync again.

  • When editing, you can synchronize the clap with the image of the clap and then the sound and image will run at the same speed.

And last but not least, watch the filming tutorial → before you start shooting.

Good luck !

TO CLOSE THIS FILE CLICK AT 'SLUIT' ^

Editor

You functions are:                                           

  • To use the editing of the film to create a complete story. This is where research, interviewing and filming come together. In consultation with the team, scenes or questions can be left out to make the film stronger. 

  • To be bound to the truth. You are not allowed to transform what a guest/main character has said into another story. 

  • To look for suitable music or sounds for the film and make titles if necessary. The researchers will provide these and are responsible for correct spelling.

Responsibilities:

  • Assembly of the complete film.

  • Practice with the assembly tool if necessary.

  • Getting the right laptop/computer for editing from your teacher.

  • Providing music and audio for the entire film.

  • Close consultation with the interviewer and cameraman/woman about choices to be made in the editing (what do you leave out, in what order do you tell your story).


* A good editor will watch the editing tutorial → and read the steps for editing. If time allows, also watch the filming tutorial →

Steps for editing

CLICK HERE to open ⌄

Steps for Editing

Preparation

  • Get a computer or laptop.
  • Download an editing programme and test it out.

  • Look at the instructions.

  • Upload the film material together with the cameraman/woman using the following programmes;

You can edit with the following programs;

Choosing

  • Go through all the material and choose the best parts (together with the interviewer/cameraman-woman).

First draft

  • Make a first draft of your editing and do not hesitate to switch scenes to see if it improves your story.

  • Adopt tips from the tutorial in your editing.

  • Discuss your options with the team.

  • Save!!!! Use your save button as much as you can or use an auto saver that will save your edit every 10 minutes. 

Final draft

  • Finalise your editing.
  • Choose music that is free of copyright restrictions as indicated in the tutorial. (links in tutorial)

  • Add sound effects.

  • Add titles.

Download as MP4

Download your film as an MP4 file and send it to your teacher via email or WeTransfer

TO CLOSE THIS FILE CLICK AT 'SLUIT' ^

Tutorials for documentary making

Specifications for filming on a mobile phone

Settings:

Please set your phone to record at 1080p HD resolution by following these instructions:

  • iPhone: Please set your iPhone to said resolution via Settings >Camera>Record Video. Pick 1080p HD at 30fps.

  • Android Samsung, Huawei, HTC, etc: This differs per phone, but these settings can mostly be found via the settings menu inside the camera app or via the general settings menu. In this menu locate the video size menu. Best setting for filming is 1080p HD and 25fps.

  • If this option is not available on your phone, please make sure it is not a number below 1080p and/or 25fps or above 50fps.

Stability:

Try to create a stable environment by using a tripod or a chair to lean on.

Sound

If possible, use an additional microphone. If you do not have one, avoid filming too far away from your sound object or person.

Extra sound and synchronisation:

You could also use an extra phone to record the sound but then you have to synchronise both phones using a clap:

  • Start the audio on one phone and the camera on the other. Now synchronise by clapping your hands slowly. Make sure you record and film the hands and sound.

  • Do not stop your phone after this point. If you stop, you will have to sync again.

  • When editing, you can synchronise the clap with the image of the clap and then the sound and image will run at the same speed.

And last but not least, watch the filming tutorial before you start shooting.

Good luck !

Assessment grid for the students’ documentaries

Version1 - assessing the documentaries while working on them

 

download

download the assesement as a word doc here

Statement of consent

Statement of consent

If you interview a youngster under the age of 18 you have to make a statement of constent to sign for your parent;

you can download the word doc to print here

Step 4 Part 1 - Exchange and discussion within and with the partner school

download this assesement as a word doc here

Step 4 Part 2 - VPRO questionnaire to assess the project

Please fill in the final questionnaire